Category Archives: candy

Goodnow Farms Chocolate: Three New Bars

 

If you read my previous review of Goodnow Farms chocolate, you know what a fan I am; especially, of their Esmeraldas bar.

Here are some tasting notes on two of their newest offerings:

77% Dark Chocolate with Las Palomas Coffee. These delicious beans hail from Guatemala. Their fruitiness pairs beautifully with the deeply satisfying George Howell coffee. Unlike many other coffee and chocolate bars, this one is as smooth as silk. Sometimes it’s fun to have the added crunch of tiny pieces of coffee beans and sometimes it’s celestial to have this uber-creamy experience. At Goodnow Farms they press their own single origin cocoa butters from the beans in each bar. This is a truly passionate endeavor that results in an incredibly velvety texture and the intense single origin flavor.

Their Special Reserve 77% Dark Chocolate with Lawley’s Rum from Boston Harbor Distillery is a slam dunk for those of you who, like me, love the combination of alcohol and chocolate. Here, the beans are from Ecuador. Their caramel-vanilla-molasses oakiness is sublime with the richness of the rum. As Goodnow Farms hasn’t added vanilla to these bars, the essence of the bean shines through.

Even though I have written about their 70% Ucayali Peruvian bar before, I wanted to let you know it has received numerous awards from the Academy of Chocolate and the International Chocolate Awards.

As I am always interested in packaging, let me remind you these come in hard cardboard envelopes to keep their lovely, perfectly tempered chocolate intact. Each bar rests in an inner reclosable cellophane sleeve that is a delight to use.

If you haven’t tried Goodnow Farms chocolate this is the time to start. Their shipping ensures your chocolate will arrive in pristine condition 12 months of the year. In addition, the box is adorned with a beautiful painting of their farm.

 

 

 

 

 

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Lakrids Licorice with Chocolate

We all have a few strange food combinations we love. I used to adore peanut butter with sliced avocado and Sriracha, for example.

Similarly, the concept of black licorice with chocolate may seem a bit unlikely, but it works. I just sampled three different varieties of this combination from a Denmark confectionary called Lakrids.

Johan Bülow, the founder of Lakrids, always knew he wanted to create something original and delicious. He thought since Scandinavians have traditionally loved licorice, he would start with that. Together with production manager Tage, Johan developed the idea to coat the licorice with chocolate. They were told that it couldn’t be done…always an incentive for creative souls. By 2007 Johan was rolling out chocolate coated licorice.

To me, Johan’s concept of using licorice as a spice, like anise in five spice Chinese dishes, is quite ground breaking. That it works is even more exciting.

My favorite of the three I sampled was the dark with coffee. It was the least sweet and offered a trove of textures: chewy, crunchy, creamy; and flavors: mocha (the classic mix of coffee and chocolate) licorice, and 63% dark milk chocolate. The crunch came from tiny bits of ground coffee. Just fabulous. One orb was incredibly satisfying.

His Milk chocolate flavor is a bit misleading, as Johan uses a 63% dark milk to coat the licorice centers. I think it’s an excellent choice as the addition of milk adds a lovely rich flavor and velvety texture that makes the chewiness of the licorice really dance with the chocolate.

White chocolate infused with passion fruit was the sweetest of the three, though the white chocolate here is a 51% with vanilla, so it’s a much more complex animal. Creamy yet fully capable of awakening my taste buds with the juxtaposition of slightly acidic passion fruit and anise flavors. A very dessert-like treat.

There are many other flavors available, like salt and caramel, red currant, habanero, sea buckthorn, vanilla mango, and strawberry and cream. You can be sure Johan is devising new delights as I write this.

If you know a chocophile who is always looking to try a new rendition of their favorite food, this would make a great gift.

Dave’s Sweet Tooth Toffee

Everyone has a little child inside them. No matter how mature or sophisticated you become that little child will always crave a certain amount of attention. One delicious way to give your inner child the chocolate attention they so rightly deserve is with Dave’s Toffee. In one fell swoop, it sates your adult cravings for something handmade with real ingredients and your inner child’s desire for a crunchy, slightly sweet, nutty, chocolate treat.

When I was younger, I used to love dessert. Ice cream, cheesecake, chocolate mousse cake, and this amazing peanut butter brownie bombe draped in a dark chocolate ganache. It ticked all the boxes of my sybaritic self. Now, I find architect Mies van der Rohe was right: less really can be more.

It’s amazing how a smaller amount of something truly satisfying can feel so decadent and enough.

Dave’s Toffee is affordable, but it feels incredibly luxurious. It’s visually attractive, super fresh and would appeal to almost anyone of any age. So, not only does it make a beautiful gift, but it is also something you can enjoy on a regular basis.

While I can still appreciate the most amazing handmade passion fruit truffle enrobed in 73% Vietnamese chocolate; luckily, I haven’t lost my ability to enjoy something classic and perfectly executed.

I sampled five of their offerings.

The uber-crunchy coffee toffee infused with little bits of coffee bean was amazing. What a great way to get a bit of extra energy in the afternoon.

The dark chocolate with cherry was a delicious combination enhanced by the lovely counterpoint of tart sweetness from the cherries.

Plain milk and dark versions are anything but plain, as the generous portion of nuts makes them texturally craveable.

The peanut toffee was also delicious, and a great choice for people who can’t get enough of that peanut/chocolate combo.

All Dave’s Toffees have an incredible texture that is perfectly friable in your mouth. In other words, it starts out crunchy and then in the most amazing alchemical way becomes tiny shards…I know that doesn’t sound appealing, but believe me it’s a wonderful experience…as those delicate fragments of toffee somehow melt in your mouth.

Moka Origins Chocolate

I wanted to share Moka Origins mission statement: “To create employment, heal the environment and reinvent the way consumers shop for chocolate and coffee. We strive for the betterment of farmers and their families around the world. By maintaining and investing into our own farm in Cameroon, and by uniting with farming partners around the world, we generate real social change.” I am 100% behind those values, which seem to be part of a larger trend in the craft chocolate bar community, and a welcome one. Of course, it helps when the chocolate is as delicious as these bars from Moka Origins. If you’re more deeply interested in their social impact you can view a beautiful short description here: https://mokaorigins.com/pages/social-impact.

I sampled eight of their 3.5 ounce bars. New varieties appear regularly and can sell out quickly, like the Strawberry White Chocolate. I’m reviewing it anyway, just in case it comes back into rotation, or they offer another white chocolate bar. Typically, I avoid white chocolate and think of it as an oxymoron. Luckily, I like to be wrong. This pretty pink bar was studded with cocoa nibs adding a surprisingly wonderful and unexpected texture that riffed off the uber-creaminess of the strawberry infused chocolate.

The Toffee Almond Chocolate (70%) made with Camino Verde beans from Equador, was another revelation. I expected something cloyingly sweet. What I got was an extraordinarily complex experience of flavors, textures, and aromas all in a visually enticing bar. The topping was a tad sticky, but it appealed to the three year old inside me. The chocolate was beautifully tempered with a glossy finish and nice snap. This was the most adult rendition of these flavors I could imagine…actually, it was beyond my imaginings and quite crave worthy. Despite that, it’s not addictive. Two squares truly sated my desire.

Another stunner was their Cherry Chocolate (72%) with Zorzal Cacao from the Dominican Republic. The earthy, satisfying almost-heavy tasting chocolate was a perfect partner to sweet, slightly acidic chewy dried cherries. The more I ate this, the more aware I became of the cherry undertones in the chocolate itself.

Lemon Ginger (73%) with Brazilian beans, was an incredible combination of textures, tastes, and visual beauty. Also a tad sticky, like the Toffee Almond bar, it was generously strewn with bits of chewy ginger and lemon. Again, I was thrilled with the overall sweetness level of this bar as it was clearly made for people who don’t want a sugar rush. Both this bar and the Toffee rendition are amazingly desserty and feel like a huge treat.

Their 72% plain dark bar from Brazilian beans is rich, dense with chocolate flavor and has a slightly dry finish. It also comes in a rendition with blueberries adding some extra acidity and chewiness from the fresh tasting dried fruit.

Even though it has the same 72% cacao content as the Brazilian beans, the Sea Salt tastes very different. The salt is imbedded on the surface of the chocolate, which looks lovely, and adds a slight crunch, while making the bar more complex and astringent.

Last but not least, is their 70% Espresso with Camino Verde beans from Ecuador. Finely ground coffee, from Moka Origins, is sprinkled generously across the surface of the bar adding both textural interest and a hint of caffeine.

I enjoyed the whole range, though the standouts were the Toffee, Lemon Ginger, Cherry, and White Chocolate with Strawberry and Nibs.

They offer a chocolate of the month club where you can get two bars for $20 including shipping.

UPDATE:
Looking for a wonderful rendition of Peppermint Bark? Moka Origins has one they only offer before Christmas. It has a slab of their marvelous white chocolate topped with a layer of 70% dark and sprinkled liberally with pieces of peppermint candy. Each piece is a desert unto itself.

Gallette Chocolates

Gallette Chocolates was founded in São Paulo, Brazil by electrical engineer Gislaine Gallette. Her attention to detail, ethical sourcing, and sustainable business practices are all evident in the chocolate bars and truffles she crafts.

Each of the well tempered 100 gram bars are molded into a beautiful modernist design of 21 squares with bas relief edges.

40% Milk with Almonds scattered on the bottom is made with Trinitarian beans from Brazil. The chocolate itself is rich, creamy and velvety. You can also buy this in a plain version.

56% Dark Milk, also made with Trinitarian beans from Brazil, is a more adult version of the 40% Milk bar. A great choice for people who want a smooth dark bar without any acidity and plenty of plummy fruit flavor.

65% Fazenda Catongo is a satisfying deeply flavored bar with a slightly dry finish.

70% Forestero from the Amazon is the most complex of those I sampled. It has an earthy, chocolate flavor with a lovely smooth texture.

Elegant packaging makes this chocolate a wonderful gift.

Askanya Haitian Chocolate

I am going to focus my review of the actual chocolate from Askanya as the following link will take you to an excellent write-up of the company, its founders, their history, and vision: http://kreyolicious.com/askanya-haitian-chocolate-industry/24851.

I sampled four 55 gram bars, all of which had a fairly fudgey consistency. The colorful wrappers are beautifully designed, as is the company logo: a profile of a Haitian woman with a large flower in her hair. The bars themselves sport a beautiful curvilinear design in bas relief with a hibiscus in the center.

I don’t usually gravitate towards milk chocolate, but Askanya’s Paradis 47% dark milk was so redolent of caramel it beckoned me. Unlike many milk bars, a small square left me totally satisfied.

Their other milk offering, 50% Wanga Nègès, was completely different. More rustic texturally (though not like a stone ground bar), it lent itself to the deeper, richer, raisin and plummy notes of the bean.

Next up was their 60% Minuet dark bar. A good choice for people who might not think they like dark chocolate as it had no discernible acidity, tobacco or edgy aspects to it. Easy to eat with a dry finish.

Askanya’s 90%: Perle Rare, brings you right to Haiti’s earthy doorstep. Intense without being bitter, it delivered a chocolate hit with a short finish.

SoChatti Chocolate

Jessica Halstead, the chocolate maker behind SoChatti, is truly innovative. I sampled her pourable chocolate this morning and it was an absolute delight to work with. At first, I must confess, I was daunted by the delivery system, an eight ounce pouch of hardened chocolate that I was supposed to soften in water at 110 degrees. The temperature was crucial and it was not to go above that mark. Being a bit of rebel I kept adding warmer water to keep it at 110 which meant it sometimes went a bit above that target. Apparently, there’s more wiggle room than I thought. After about 20 minutes and a few massages of the bag to evenly distribute its contents, I was ready to experiment. Since the chocolate was such high quality I didn’t want to over-adulterate it by adding too many ingredients, so I stuck to making mendiants and decorations.

I played with all sorts of free-form chocolate decorations on a piece of wax paper, just to test how user friendly the pouch delivery system would be. It’s incredibly easy to maneuver. I was able to get thick or thin strands of chocolate, curvilinear lines, and all sorts of shapes…even building up the chocolate for more 3D decorations.

The mendiants were a breeze: I put little dollops of chocolate on the wax paper and pressed either a lightly candied maple pecan on top, or a roasted pistachio with a freeze dried cherry or raspberry. All the chocolate began to harden at room temperature fairly quickly. (I stored it in the fridge as I have come to love the extra crisp temper of refrigerated chocolate.)

The batch from Ecuador and Tanzania (#18002) was a deliciously fruity chocolate with just the right amount of acidity to add complexity. SoChatti offers a variety of chocolates from Tanzania, Peru, and Madagascar. At $19.99 including shipping from Amazon they are also a very good value.

Not only is this a great way to unleash your own inner chocolatier it’s also a great project to do with children as the half pound pouch gives you plenty to play with. Your imagination is the only limitation. Not feeling particularly ambitious? Just empty the melted chocolate into a bowl, add your favorite ingredients, stir, and make a big slab chocolate bark. What could be easier or more fun when those chocolate cravings strike?

SoChatti is unique, delicious and versatile. If you follow the directions (and they will soon offer a warmer to make it even easier) you can create incredible chocolates without having to go through the more traditional and slower tempering process. If you are curious about making high quality, single origin chocolates at home, and don’t want to invest in an expensive tempering machine, try SoChatti and experiment to your heart’s (and palate’s) delight.