Category Archives: Fair Trade Chocolate

Amore di Mona

In our current chocolate laden world it is difficult to create something that stands out. Chef Meagan of Amore di Mona has managed to do that with her Madhava agave sweetened dark chocolates and caramels. Using agave gives them a much lower glycemic index and is particularly well suited to caramels.

I sampled the plain dark bar first. With only four grams of sugar in a 35 gram portion, the whole bar, it was just sweet enough to make it a treat, rather than a health food. The agave has an interesting effect on the temper, giving it a slightly creamier texture.

Next up were the two Caramela bars, each weighing in at 64 grams. It’s hard to believe there are only two grams of sugar in each 21 gram square, as they taste rich and immensely satisfying. The very fact that there are three large squares per box makes them a super portable way to enjoy dark chocolate coated caramels. I can easily see taking these along with me to the movies, as their perfectly chewy centers prolongs your enjoyment. The one with cranberries adds an extra layer of sweetness and texture. Using apple juice sweetened cranberries makes these even more crave-worthy, while the addition of organic ground vanilla beans beautifully rounds out the caramel-chocolate flavors.

I also tried their box of assorted chocolates: dark, caramela, caramela with cranberries, caramela with cherries, caramela with crunchy coffee beans, dark with currants, and dark with crunchy coffee beans. The dark chocolates are heart-shaped and very visually appealing. The caramelas are more rectangular. Slightly chewy, creamy caramel blends wonderfully with all the add-ins, though the one that really woke up my taste buds was studded with crunchy coffee beans. What a great juxtaposition of flavors and textures.

Always one to pay attention to packaging, I appreciated the ribbon and seal adorning both boxes.

Chocolate Naive: Peanut, Tahini, Spices, Dark with Berries, Dark with Hops, Dark Milk with Porcini, and Nicaragua Nicaliso

Lithuanians love their beer; especially, unfiltered, raw beers. Hence, this pairing of dark (67%) chocolate and hops, a very different experience from any other I have ever tasted. The initial leathery flavor reminded me of a stout or porter with their characteristic bitterness and lingering dry aftertaste. A definite roasted flavor of hops and malt predominate. Very interesting. The bar, based on Trinitario beans, is thin, beautifully tempered, and sports that lovely Chocolate Naive logo of a man on a huge unicycle.

Dark Chocolate with Berries (65%) is almost a polar opposite to the one with hops. It is based on a Madagascar Criollo, the perfect choice with blueberries, strawberries, and black currants (all freeze-dried, powdered, and fully amalgamated into the chocolate). This thin, snappy bar with the sweetness of fruit and the fetching tartness of berries delivers a series of exciting berry fireworks in each bite. A real jewel.

Another bar in this range is their Nicaragua Nicaliso (70%), a predominantly Criollo bean. Unlike other Criollos, this has a bit of an acidic edge, nothing harsh, just there to add another dimension to this typically gentle chocolate. The addition of clarified butter is ingenious as it enhances all the inherent flavors of this Central American cacao while adding an extra-velvety texture. Immensely satisfying and more complex than most Criollos.

I sampled three bars in their new organic range: Mulate. Tahini is a dark milk (45%) with tahini and a stage whisper of sesame seeds. A great marriage of super creamy chocolate and slightly chewy-crunchy, roasted sesame seeds, it won the Northwest Chocolate Festival’s Bronze Medal. Unique and delicious.

Their Mulate Peanut with Sea Salt (45%) combines smooth peanut butter with clarified butter to produce a subtle, but still noticeable, peanut taste in a velvety chocolate.

Spices is the name of the third bar in this trinity. On reading the ingredients: dark chocolate (65%) with cinnamon, vanilla, and cayenne, it would be easy to jump to the conclusion that cayenne steals the show. Not so, it was the vanilla that hit me first, then a bit of cinnamon, with the cayenne’s heat and spice finishing everything off and lingering. Since all bars with hot spices have varying intensities, I would rank this heat level as medium. Not so in-your-face that your mouth is burning, and not so mild you don’t notice it. A perfect amount to allow the other flavors, and the creaminess of their dark chocolate (enhanced with clarified butter), to shine.

Design has always been important to Chocolate Naive and they have gone in a completely different direction with this range. Typically, their bar packaging is a clean-looking cardboard envelope with a re-closable plastic sleeve inside. The Mulate bars come in a glossy, stiffer cardboard adorned with fantastical images in a rich palette of colors, with a foil inner wrapper.

In its own category is their Dark Milk (67%) “Back to the Origins” bar with Porcini. Wow. What a surprise. The approachable earthiness of freeze-dried wild porcini mushrooms with clarified butter in this luxuriously silky dark milk chocolate is far from what I would have expected. Not only do the flavors mesh perfectly, they complement each other. Here, 2 + 2 = 10. The woodsy porcini and complex chocolate flavors blend seamlessly to produce something unpredictably lush. You just have to experience it for yourself.

Chocolate and Love

To a chocolate sybarite there is something exquisite about discovering a truly delicious and intensely satisfying 80% bar. I just had that wonderful experience as I dove into Chocolate and Love’s 80% Panama single origin chocolate. Beautifully tempered, it makes an audible snap when you break off one of the 24 little rectangles. Creating a great super dark chocolate takes real talent, as you can’t distract the palate with add-ins (even though I love them, too), like nuts, fruit, nibs, coffee, milk, cream, or sweeteners. This bar delivers one of the most balanced chocolate flavor profiles I have ever had. With its ultra smooth texture, raw cane sugar and vanilla pods, and only seven grams of sugar in a 37 gram portion, you have a winner on all fronts.

To make things even more appealing, Chocolate and Love houses their bars in beautiful wrappers with images of flowers, Chinese symbols, cocoa pods, hearts, peacock feathers, fruits, and leaves making them a joy to behold and give as gifts.

The beans are Trinitario, and my favorite: Criollo.

After my ecstatic 80% Panama experience, I thought I would try their 55% bar with Caramel and Sea Salt. Here, the caramel comes in a subtle crunchy form with the sea salt a zingy counterpoint.

Also in their 55% range is Dark Chocolate with Coffee. I really enjoyed the mocha flavor and appreciated their choice of 55% cocoa for its creamier texture.

At 65%, the Orange bar gives you a foretaste of what’s to come with its citrus scent.

67% Mint is a gentle presence in the form of tiny bits of peppermint crunch.

My last sample was their aptly named Filthy Rich 71% bar. For a 71% chocolate it was very mild, so if you are looking for a higher cacao content that won’t hit you upside the head, this is it.

The company is owned by Birgitte Hovman and Richard O’Connor. They are committed to making chocolate in an ethical manner and running their company similarly, So far, they have planted 22,000 trees in Ethiopia through the Weforest organization. In addition, their cocoa comes from small scale family farms through COCABO cooperative, a pioneer in sustainable management and conservable resources.

Baroness Chocolates

There are over 360 reviews on this site, and for almost all of them I have relied on my own opinion. Once I sample the chocolates I typically share them with friends and family. Last night, however, I deviated from that routine and enlisted the help of six chums to tell me what they thought of Baroness Chocolates. I had already tasted the bars a few times and found them immensely appealing visually and full of wonderfully crunchy, chewy, creamy textures. Everyone thought the bars looked tantalizing and kept coming back for more, always a good sign.

The first thing I noticed about Baroness was the beautiful type-face of the company’s name. Reminiscent of the 1940s, its curvilinear, chubby letters evoked a sense of sumptuousness. Then, I spied a very creative coat of arms with two dogs, a unicorn, lion, fish, diamond, maple leaves, and a crown, beneath which is written “Invictus,” or undefeated. (You can read more about the coat of arms at the end of the review.)

The company’s motto, “Act with sincerity, Live with joy,” reflects their belief that chocolate should create joy and excitement. Any chocophile knows how even a whiff of cocoa can instantly lift someone’s mood. In keeping with their motto, they make sure the chocolates are sourced from Rainforest Alliance certified farmers in São Tomé, Ghana, Nigeria, Cote D’Ivoire, Peru, Colombia, Cameroon and Brazil. The farmers take steps to maintain or increase the tree cover, conserve soil quality and prevent erosion, reduce chemical use, protect wildlife, and ensure the well being of workers and their families by facilitating access to education and health care. In addition, they use only Tahitian vanilla, pure cocoa butter, whole cane sugar, muscavado sugar, agave syrup, and Dead Sea Salt. Their cream comes from cows living in open pastures. Even their gluten free cookies, caramel, butterscotch, sponge toffee, and brittle are made in house. The people at Baroness are committed to creating good chocolate karma.

The seven bars we all tasted were very appetizing with their generous mélange of nuts, cranberries, or drizzle on top.

Here’s the scoop:

AIyaaaa!, dark milk chocolate with almonds, sea salt and butterscotch. This is one of the five organic and Fairtrade bars. It is sweet, crunchy, and perked up with a touch of salt.

Love and Blessings, also organic, is a creamy blend of 50% milk and 50% dark. It offers both the richness of dark chocolate with the creaminess of milk.

Mocha Krunjay, organic, is a medium dark chocolate with coffee, toffee, sea salt and almonds. The coffee is noticeable but not overpowering, allowing it to take its fellow ingredients into adult territory. Quite yummy.

Subversive Squirrel, organic, is a not-too-sweet bar with very dark chocolate, peanuts, and brittle. I swooned over this combo.

Tantric Tiger, organic, is a semi-sweet base with roasted almonds, cranberries and sea salt, a decadent combination of flavors and textures.

Dob Dobs is semi-sweet chocolate with a filling of caramel topped with pecans. This is a more dessert-like bar and would be fabulous with Turkish coffee or espresso.

Tummy rub is a milk base with crunchy chocolate cookies in the middle. The combination of smooth, creamy milk chocolate and almost friable cookie is another dessert contender.

I was intrigued by the coat of arm and asked Billy Macy, the president of Baroness Chocolate, what each image symbolized.
Here is his reply:

“I started by first considering what was included in the Canadian Coat of Arms.
At he top of Baroness’s coat of arms is the maple leaf. Nothing says Canada quite like a maple leaf.
I then took the lion and unicorn from the sides of the Canadian Coat of Arms, moved them to the top and added wings. They represented courage and strength and a little magical fantasy (unicorn).
Then, I took the crown and put it on an angle to show royalty with whimsy (Canada is part of the the British Commonwealth).
I added the dogs on the side of the shield. They are Weimaraners, the dogs I have had throughout my life. They are very loving and do not know they are a dog. My 100 lb lap dog likes to sleep in the bed with or without the cat. Crazy but true.
The dogs are wearing a toque which I unfortunately am required to wear for 6 months a year in Canada. It also looks like a traditional baron’s headgear.
The shield has the B for Baroness, a diamond to represent all the bar logos which are based on the facets of jewels. And there is a fish. First off my wife Kaye is an artist who did a series on fish. She also believes, as she is Chinese, that fish are good luck. I thought once I have a horse, a cat, wings for birds and dogs I might as well have fish, too.
The last element is the word Invictus at the bottom. Invictus is from a poem about an unconquerable soul that is made to suffer. The poem was recently made more popular by Nelson Mandela. He read it over and over to give him strength during his imprisonment. More importantly to my wife and me, our late daughter Kaila had the word tattooed on her shoulder, as she found solace from the poem. Kaila was born with an aggressive form of cancer. She lived through the treatment but it left her with many medical issues that needed to be addressed during her life. She had 17 major surgeries including a heart transplant at the age of 14. She never burdened the world instead bringing joy and strength to others until she passed at the age of 19, 4 years ago. I guess after we lost her I needed to change my life to something more joyful, I found it was hard for my wife to cry when her mouth was full of chocolate. So I kept making her try everything I created. Eventually we decided to make our hobby a business. We concluded our Kickstarter Campaign on November 27th, 2013. In just one year we went from Kickstarter to being in Whole Foods across Canada, by the end of next week our bars will be available for sale from Coast to Coast in Canada.”

Seed and Bean Chocolate

The older I get the more I appreciate something different, as long as it’s not different for different’s sake. When it comes to chocolate, that might be a particularly fabulous bean, a new flavor combination, or just a novel take on a classic. So, smoked Cornish sea salt in a 70% bar, or coconut and raspberry intrigue me.

Seed and Bean is based in Britain and devoted to producing an organic, Fair Trade, handmade chocolate range using beans from four areas: the ‎two volcanic islands of São Tomé and Príncipe, Ecuador, and the Dominican Republic.

I sampled five of their dark bars:

70% with Cornish Sea Salt is a very silky chocolate from Nacional cacao enhanced with a hint of smoked salt. It sated my chocolate craving with its lingering briny edge, and micro-crystals of subtle crunch. A truly excellent bar. The more I ate of this delectable bar the more I loved it.

72% Extra Dark from Dominican Trinitario beans is a deep, layered experience of dark fruit flavors in a very smooth, slowly melting bar.

58% Just Ginger is made from the same bean with the addition of spicy ginger. Here, though, the ginger is not crystalized, but powdered. This allows it to fully infiltrate every bite, adding just the right amount of heat and complexity to a sweeter, creamier chocolate.

72% Chili and Lime is fetchingly hot and citrusy. Not scorchingly hot, but hot enough to grab your attention without making you suffer. The beans are Dominican Trinitarios.

66% Coconut and Raspberry uses São Tomé cacao, a touch of virgin coconut oil, raspberries, and raw cane sugar to create an easy-to scarf-down chocolate. The coconut oil adds just a hint of flavor while complementing the raspberries and velvetizing the texture.

Seed and Bean currently offers 18 different bars, including milk and white options. You can order from outside the U.K. by contacting them on their website. (All the companies I have reviewed are linked on the right side of this page.)

Mystery Chocolate Box

Mystery Chocolate Box is the brainchild of Peter Messmer. When Peter was growing up, his family had a tradition where one of them would buy a bunch of chocolate bars, remove the outer label, and try to guess what was in each bar. Then, they read out their guesses and the person who brought the chocolates revealed the answers. They found the guessing and the eating a ton of fun, not to mention having a great time together as a family.

Peter and his family found out how different it was to taste what was in a chocolate bar once they already knew the ingredients, from trying to blindly figure out add-ins without any clues. As someone who eats chocolate daily, I can attest to his assertion.

If you aren’t already intrigued and need a bit more incentive, you can win a prize if you guess correctly on their website within a specified amount of time.

The three large bars (each monthly delivery including shipping is $30) arrived in perfect condition with ice packs. Each was labeled Mystery Bar A, B, or C. There was a guessing card, and information on allergies. I have decided not to post my guesses, just in case you are interested in procuring your own Mystery Chocolate Box. Suffice it to say, I am not even 100% sure I guessed correctly, and that’s even after visiting the three websites the bars came from (two of the names were printed on the bars themselves, while for the third nameless one, I did a little sleuthing).

Peter focuses on this as a family activity, which is a great way to do something different and fun with the kids. I can think of plenty of teens, and adults who would love it, too. It could also be a great fund-raiser for your favorite charity if done in small groups.

Barefoot & Chocolate

Is there really anyone who doesn’t like Nutella? I must admit I don’t usually indulge my cravings because it’s like chocolate crack and all too easy to overdo. But, my real reason for not eating it is the hydrogenated oils. Barefoot & Chocolate, whose name derives from the Sasha and Trent’s images of “jumping in the lake on a hot summer day, bliss inducing yoga, and sharing laughs with dear friends over good food and chocolate,” makes a Hazelnut Chocolate spread that is even more delicious with no hydrogenated oils.

The texture is dreamily creamy, the flavor a great juxtaposition of chocolate, nuts, and sweetness. (Over twice the amount of nuts in other spreads.) I can’t imagine a child who wouldn’t be just crazy about this. As an adult, it appealed to my inner kid. I don’t know about you, but when I get a new toy I like to experiment. I started imagining well-toasted English muffins with some gorgonzola and hazelnut chocolate spread, crepes with fruit and hazelnut chocolate spread, filling little chocolate liqueur cups garnished with a caramelized hazelnut, as the center of mini chocolate meringues topped with raspberries, or swirled into Greek yogurt. This jar is just brimming with possibilities. Trent, one of the founders, has some incredibly delectable recipes on their website, like: Chocolate Quesadillas, Chocolate Hazelnut Pumpkin Pie, and Banana Coconut Chocolate Almond Bread.

I also tried their Almond Coconut Chocolate spread, which was completely different. The consistency is still creamy, but thicker, and the coconut has been completely amalgamated into its luxuriously velvety texture. I found the chocolate almond flavors predominated with the coconut adding a subtle undertones. It’s a tiny bit less sweet and would be fabulous on whole grain toast with thin slices of crisp apple or barely ripe banana, sprinkled with a few grains of sea salt.