Category Archives: chocolate chips

Weaver Nut Sweets & Snacks

Whether you’re a chef, home cook, or just love chocolate, Weaver Nut Sweets and Snacks has you covered. Their website, with its abundance of candies, chocolates, and nuts, is easiest to navigate if you type in what you are looking for in the search box, as opposed to looking through the huge range of products listed under “chocolate.” That said, you could come across some old favorite candy by searching in more global categories or by brand. For example, if I have a craving for Bonomo Turkish Taffy I now know where to get it.

In addition to their cornucopia of candy, they offer some excellent chocolates and their prices are very reasonable. In fact, some of them were great deals.

I sampled four of their high end covertures starting with Callebaut’s Dark 53.8% Couverture Callets/Chips (#04453). As you might imagine, these are on the sweeter side, which makes them a high end substitution for generic semi-sweet chips. They would also be a good choice as couverture for nuts, coffee beans, or nibs.

Callebaut’s 65% Inaya Couverture Pistoles ( #04621) boast a captivating deep chocolate presence with dark fruit notes and roasted cacao. An excellent choice for baked goods, drinks, and mousses.

Callebaut’s São Tomé 70% dark chocolate callets/chips (#04610) are wonderful for tempering as mendiants, couverture, barks, or in ganaches. They have a more robust flavor than the Inaya. Callebaut chefs recommend using it with fruits that have a moderate to high acidity and sweetness. Slightly bitter ingredients such as walnuts or mild coffees and spices such as Sichuan pepper also marry well with its dark red fruit flavors.

My absolute favorite was the Cacao Barry Tanzanie 75% (#04611). A fantastic chocolate that would be good for anything. It was simultaneously gentle, like a Criollo, and powerful with an intriguing flavor profile combining ginseng, ripe black fruits, slight smokiness and a lingering edgy finish.

They also carry Barry Callebaut Ghana Origine Milk Callets 41%, Callebaut Fairtrade 811NV 53.8% Dark Chocolate Callets, and Cacao Barry Venezuela 72% Origine Rare Dark Callets.

Weaver is definitely a great resource for bulk couverture as well as nuts, dried fruits, and candy decorating supplies.

Santa Barbara Chocolate

I have just tasted one of the best single origin chocolates, and that’s saying a lot, as there are plenty of excellent options out there. It’s a 73% bulk wafer from Vietnam offered by Santa Barbara Chocolate. The flavor is round, full, fruity, floral, balanced, and complex with a slightly dry finish. Like an edgy criollo. I love criollo beans, but they can sometimes seem a bit too gentle and predictable on the palate. This chocolate, which contains cocoa butter and vanilla, delivers all its fascinating flavors in a velvety texture.

Making this a 73% was inspired as it heightens all the nuances of the cacao with just the right amount of sugar. At $39 for a three pound bag it’s also an incredible bargain. One two ounce bar tempered into an ornate mold in fancy packaging would easily fetch $10, or more. I would suggest transferring some straight from the bag into a pretty glass jar and giving it as gifts…economical, unique, and luxurious.

While I temper chocolate as a moving meditation, I found these Vietnamese wafers almost impossible to adulterate with anything. They’re irresistible right out of the bag; and, their size and shape couldn’t be better for a perfectly timed melt at body temperature. At some point, I will make mendiants with maple glazed pecans or pistachios and thinly sliced dates or dried mango, but not now. Today I want to bask in the glory of this bean. (Two days later…ever the experimenter, I tempered some of this extraordinary chocolate and added dehydrated raspberries. The acidity of the fruit brought out even more floral fruity notes from the chocolate. So, even though it stands alone, it also plays well with others.)

I also sampled their organic Hispaniola 100% chocolate wafers sourced from the Dominican Republic. They have a very robust, intense, super chocolatey flavor noticeably without leather, soil, licorice, or tobacco notes that makes them perfect for baking. I tempered some and added 25% demerara sugar. The slight sweetness and crunch of the crystalized sugar was a fascinating foil for the Hispaniola flavors.

The 60% version of this bean is very versatile with its lush fruity flavor and lends itself to tempering, baking, or just eating out of the bag. A fun fact about this bean: it was the first cacao Christopher Columbus tasted when he arrived in the New World.

Then there were the 70% organic dark chocolate chips without soy lecithin. I can’t remember having mini-chips with such a deep, refined chocolate presence and a sublimely balanced flavor profile. They were a great addition to a batch of maple tahini chocolate chip cookies.

My last treat was their Caribbean 67% which also had a fruity presence and a slightly dry, lingering finish. In my experience, these fruitier beans are just excellent for couverture and desserts as they support a galaxy of flavors, like citrus, berries, nuts, seeds, coffee beans, and spices.

In addition to a great selection of products for the professional or avocational chocolatier, Santa Barbara Chocolate makes beautiful large organic truffles. Mine arrived in a stunning tall red faux leather box adorned with a sumptuous black silk ribbon. The box itself opens up sideways to form four smaller boxes that each contained four truffles. These are incredibly rich, vegan, and infused with organic coconut milk and organic honey. A memorable gift for someone you love or want to impress.

Santa Barbara curates a very special collection of cacao. Each item is handpicked for its unique properties, whether organic, Rainforest alliance certified, or coconut palm sugar sweetened, you can be sure it will be both high quality and a good value.

I focused this review on their dark offerings, but they also have milk, white, and compound chocolates, cocoa, drinking chocolate, and beans.

While I didn’t sample the Belgian Dark Chocolate Grand Aroma, I thought you might enjoy the following recipe from Santa Barbara’s owner and chocolatier Jason Vishnefske.

INGREDIENTS FOR BELGIAN BEER CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES

Beer Ganache:

8oz. Belgian Beer
3oz. Honey
1lb. 4oz. of our Imported Ever the experimenter, I tempered some of this Vietnamese chocolate and added dehydrated raspberries. The result was just what I had in mind: the acidity of the fruit brought out even more floral fruity notes from the chocolate.
3oz. Butter

Additional Chocolate Ingredient:

Belgian Milk Chocolate Couverture

PREPARATION OF BEER TRUFFLES:

Boil the Belgian beer with honey.
Pour onto the Belgian Dark Chocolate and mix so it is smooth.
When the ganache reaches 87F add butter and mix with a hand mixer.
Pour ganache into a parchment lined sheet pan and let it crystallize for 14 hours at 60F.
Temper the milk chocolate couverture and spread a thin layer of the tempered Belgian Milk Chocolate on the ganache side.
When it’s crystallized, turn the ganache and spread another thin layer of tempered Belgian Milk Chocolate on the other side.
Cut into 1/2″ by 2″ rectangles.
Lastly, dip each ganache rectangle into tempered Belgian Dark Chocolate Grand Aroma.

Sugarfina

Rosie and Josh, the founders of Sugarfina, want you to know, “In case of emergency, candy can be used as a flotation device. Simply pop a piece in your mouth and forget all your troubles.” Perhaps, they mean an existential emergency, though I can certainly see how a few of these little parcels of sugary goodness might distract one from impending doom.

I sampled two of their tasting flights: Caramel Crush and Tall, Dark, and Rich.

Here’s a list of the contents so you have an idea of the variety.
Caramel Crush contained:
Dark Chocolate Sea Salt, English Toffee, Dark Chocolate Espresso, Matcha Green Tea, Mint Chip, Vanilla Honey, Pumpkin Pie, and Robin’s Egg.

Tall, Dark, and Rich contained:
Dark Chocolate Malt Balls, Dark Chocolate Toffee Almonds, Dark Chocolate Blueberries, Dark Chocolate Sea Salt Cashews, Danish Mocha Beans, Dark Chocolate Coffee Toffee, Dark Chocolate Mandarin Cordials, and Dark Chocolate Sea Salt Caramels.

The eight packets in each lovely Tiffany blue box with pretty patterned tissue paper were just right for one portion or sharing a tasting flight with seven friends, as the bags contained about eight pieces. This is a fun way to try many different candies without making a commitment to any one in particular.

In the Tall, Dark, and Rich category my favorites were the Mocha beans, just redolent with flavor in a well-tempered dark coffee bean shape, the crunchy, sweet Dark Chocolate Coffee Toffee, and the perky Dark Chocolate Sea Salt Caramels.

In the Caramel Crush sampling, I found the Mint Chip an appealing bright flavor combo, Matcha Green Tea intriguing, English Toffee a firmer caramel, and the Espresso a classic caramel with a hint of coffee.

With a name like Sugarfina, it should come as no surprise that these are fairly sweet candies. Perfect for people who want a taste of everything, though you can buy larger quantities of any flavors you love. There are many different confections on their website in varying portions from 3.3 ounces to five pounds.

Endangered Species 48% Milk, 72% Dark with Sea Salt and Almonds, and 72% Dark with Cherries

As much as I adore dark chocolate, I am always on the lookout for great high cacao content milk bars. Endangered Species has a 48% rendition that offers up the same velvety texture you would expect from a high end milk chocolate with an edginess that makes it far more interesting than your typical bar. I only sampled the plain, but you will be happy to know it also comes with almonds or cherries. If you love milk chocolate, but want more dark chocolate health benefits, this is the answer. I must confess, I immediately went out and bought a few more of these, they were so delicious and desserty.

I also tried their other two new bars. The Dark Chocolate with Almonds and Sea Salt is infused with tiny bits of nut and crunchy salt crystals. The shiny, well tempered dark chocolate has an audible snap, while the tiny crunchy pieces of salt and almonds almost popped with texture. 72% Dark with Cherries was an excellent conflation of dried fruit, with its tangy sweetness and appealing chewy texture, in the same very adult dark base. Here, the coffee undertones in the chocolate danced a lovely pas de deux with the cherries, each enhancing its partner.

Though all three bars are worth trying, the 48% plain milk is truly a stand-out.

Sheila G’s Brownie Brittle

First of all, kudos to the marketing genius who thought of calling these super thin brownie crisps “brownie brittle.” Alliterative, alluring, and descriptive.

They are like a brittle, or a wonderfully chocolatey tuile; perhaps a cross between a brittle and a cookie. But why quibble over terms when all that matters is how incredibly light and crunchy they are?

I was immediately drawn to the Toffee Crunch variety with its toffee craters studding a chocolate lunar landscape. I often find toffee inclusions ramp up the sweet meter, but this iteration was balanced and had the same amount of sugar as the chocolate chip variety.

Traditional Walnut was delightfully nutty and extra crunchy, with that slightly bitter edge those nuts typically bring to the table.

Chocolate Chip intensified the deep cocoa bean experience, while adding little creamy textural notes.

Sheila claims there are six to a serving, but half that would probably satisfy a moderate sweet tooth.

You could easily make a simple dish of ice cream into a company-worthy dessert by drizzling it with Kahlua and artfully sinking a large piece of Brownie Brittle at a rakish angle off to the side. Actually, the flavor of these reminded me a bit of Famous Chocolate Wafers, which got me thinking about making them into a refrigerator cake with lots of freshly whipped, vanilla infused whipped cream. If you have never made this, it’s shockingly good.

Michel Cluizel opens Chocolatrium in New Jersey

I thought this press release might be of interest.

This year, Michel Cluizel has decided to unveil the secrets of chocolate and open his facilities to the public. After the French Chocolatrium opened a few years ago in Normandy, it was high time to offer this opportunity to American chocolate lovers. Based in West Berlin (NJ), the Museum, outlet store and café create a chocolate environment for the delight of all.

Michel Cluizel is one of the few Cacaoféviers (processing beans into chocolate) in the world. For more than 15 years, Michel Cluizel Premium chocolate has been sold in the USA. In August 2004, Michel Cluizel opened Noble Ingredients, the American branch of the company now based in West Berlin (NJ). A Kosher Parve (OU certified) line of chocolate and pastries locally produced was launched last year to answer a growing demand. Eager to share his vast knowledge and his love of chocolate, the Chocolatrium is Michel Cluizel’s latest project for U.S. chocolate lovers.

The Museum, created as a 3-step exhibition, is an initiation to chocolate making. Visitors start by getting acquainted with Michel Cluizel’s family-owned company through a panel gallery and learn about the amazing history of chocolate from Aztecs to Europeans. Within the Gallery, a surprise welcomes visitors: behind a big rectangular window the Pastry Chef is working, cooking, baking to create pastries and chocolate right before your eyes.

Now aware of the history of chocolate, visitors go into the creation of chocolate “From Beans to Bars.” From the harvesting to the pressing and the conching, they experience every step of this marvelous transformation through a series of explanations, but most of all by tasting, touching and looking at the machines. Cocoa beans are roasted, and crushed, cocoa paste is pressed and mixed.

Last but not least, the tasting. Loving chocolate is necessary but not enough to be considered as a chocolate connoisseur! Learning to taste chocolate, discover its flavors, its first and second hints, its texture by letting the chocolate melt slowly on one’s tongue, is the last step of this chocolate initiation. The “Premiers Crus de Plantation” (“Single Estate Chocolate”) coming from all over the world amaze by their differences and the richness of their flavors of olives, exotic fruits or caramel.

A family-friendly museum, the exhibition is created as an interactive visit for adults as well as for children. All 5 senses are required to fully experience this initiation: looking at the process, touching the pods, listening to explanations, recognizing the smell of cocoa, tasting the chocolates. Fun activity booklets designed according to children’s ages are available on request to accompany them through this journey.

Thought of as the epitome of the initiatory route of chocolate making, the Café is open to visitors and others to discover more flavors from Michel Cluizel. The hot beverage of the typically French Café Gourmand and Chocolat Gourmand reveal the delicacy of flavors of assorted chocolate truffles. Those more turned on by cakes and pastries are seduced by the warm chocolate or hazelnut cakes whose melted heart makes theirs melt.

After the Store on the Fifth Avenue in New York, a new one is now opened as the last part of this Chocolatrium. Michel Cluizel’s selection of handcrafted French Pastries as well as chocolate creations is presented at Outlet Prices. Macaroons, éclairs, Opéra, chocolate bars from around the world, and a rotating weekly selection of products are now available–perfect for Thanksgiving and Holiday presents!

Opening Hours start on Friday, November 16.
Museum – Group appointment
Store – Order by phone and come and pick it up (all products featured on their website)
Private events are now available!

For more information, contact
Chocolatrium.us
marketing@noble-ingredientscom
575 N, 73 Route, Building D,
West Berlin, 08091, NJ
Ph: (856) 486-9292

Michel Cluizel 66% Mokaya

If you love single origin high end chocolate, you are already familiar with Michel Cluizel. His new estate bar, Mokaya, is made with Mexican beans from the Chiapas region and differs from others in his range in that it has an earthier presence. Earthy is a relative term that can span something tasting of soil to chocolate with a soupçon of terroir. Since this is a Cluizel bar, you can rest assured the earthiness is subtle, adding an extra layer of interest and complexity.

If you read about cacao plantations and chocolatiers it quickly becomes apparent how a good relationship between them helps procure the best beans. Luckily for consumers, the Cluizel family cares about all aspects of their business, not just the finished product. This means they are able to get the best cacao from the best part of the plantation.

Mokaya offers an elegant balance of coffee and licorice notes beautifully enhanced with a perfect amount of sweetness. Its smooth, creamy texture carries everything off to a lingering, slightly dry finish.

If you are hosting a chocolate tasting, all of Cluizel’s Premier Cru Single Origin bars would make for a lively discussion and a delicious chocolate trip around the equator.